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First Visit to Oman: Important rules to apply visiting this country

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visit to Oman
visit to Oman

Oman is an emerald-green land with endless desert plains stretching as far as the eye can see. The capital city of Muscat is located on the Arabian Sea coast. It is surrounded by palm trees and decorated with golden domes and mosques.

It is a diverse country with an interesting history of Arab, Persian, and Indian influences. As the only Arab state in the Gulf region, Oman has several ancient cities that date back to the times of Alexander the Great. The country also has a humid climate which makes it a popular destination for beach-goers.

This country is known for its rich culture, breathtaking sceneries, and friendly people. There are many things you should know before traveling here such as customs, dress code, visa requirements, etc. Keep on reading and prepare best for your first trip to this country!

Get your Oman eVisa

An online application for the Oman eVisa was introduced in 2018 by the Royal Oman Police to make it easier for tourists and visitors from around the world to obtain an entry permit.

There are two Omani eVisa types: a single-entry that is issued for a single visit to Oman and a multiple-entry visa that allows numerous entries to Oman.

The single-entry visa grants a permit for a stay of 10 or 30 days from the date of issuance and expires after 30 days. In turn, a multiple-entry visa allows you to stay up to 30 days and is issued for the period of 1 year.

Go to https://oman-evisa.com/ and see which Oman eVisa type will suit your needs and apply online from home in a few minutes!

What are the rules you need to be aware of before your first visit to Oman?

The visit to the Omani country should be designed as a cultural experience that would allow visitors to get the most out of their trip.

Our Omani first-timer’s guide will provide you with all the information you need to know about this beautiful country before you decide to pay your visit.

#Rule No. 1: Don’t reject the local hospitality

One thing that Omanis are famous for is their hospitality. They are warm, welcoming people who love making sure that you have a pleasant stay in their country. It can be difficult to know when to stop accepting such kindnesses from them – especially if they’re trying to make themselves at home.

A true Omani would always welcome a visitor, no matter who they are or where they come from. Don’t reject Omani hospitality, embrace it!

#Rule No. 2: Speak quietly on the street

Omani people are famous for their love of silence and tranquility. It is quite normal that the streets will be free from noise and all kinds of bustling activities.

Some people might find this annoying, but the Omanis believe it is an opportunity to focus on their own thoughts and enjoy a peaceful moment in their lives.

It is highly recommended for visitors to take a break from the noisy city life and experience Oman’s serenity.

#Rule No. 3: Dress modestly to show respect

To avoid offending people and breaking cultural norms you should always pay attention to how your clothing looks, surround yourself with others wearing similar outfits, how it fits within their culture as well as any visual cues that might be on your outfit.

Wearing long pants with long sleeves that cover the hands and feet can respect cultural norms. Women should cover their hair and shoulders when visiting mosques or other places. Where they require to cover their body.

Men should also not wear shorts or sleeveless shirts in these areas – even if it’s hot out.

#Rule No. 4: Don’t drink in public places

In Oman, it is illegal to drink alcohol in public places. The government is concerned that this would lead to increased drinking and drunk drivers.

This law not only affects local people who drink in public but also impacts those who are visiting Oman for business or tourism purposes. Many of these individuals may be accustomed to getting a “quick buzz” on the job but they are not supposed allow do this when they’re away from home.

Omani locals have mixed feelings about this law. Many see it as the government trying to control people and enforce religion on individuals who don’t follow cultural norms. Others feel that the ban will help protect Omani culture from outsiders who may not understand or respect local traditions and beliefs.

#Rule No. 5: Respect the local customs and historical sites

Oman is a nation where Islam is the official religion and Sharia law enforced. Respect is key in Oman. Tourists advise to always be conscious of their surroundings and the rules of the country. Otherwise, they could easily face penalties or even arrest.

Oman has a rich history of more than 6,000 years. Many tourist sites and cultural landmarks are located in this country. There are many sights that tourists can visit today without any hassle or problems but there are some sites that might be closed on certain days of the year or during certain hours.

Oman is one of the cleanest and most modern countries in the region. It’s not only famous for its rich history and tourist attractions but is also famous for maintaining a high level of urbanization. Visitors must clean up after themselves or can be faced with fines or penalties. Don’t sweep litter onto Oman’s tourist attractions. If you see a trash can, you should use it, but there are also usually signs around to remind people of their need to take care of such places.

Final thoughts

It’s time to start packing your bags and crafting your itinerary! Don’t forget to include some of the most popular attractions in the country, such as snorkeling, jeep riding, and exploring the numerous ancient sites.

Apply for your Oman eVisa from home using your phone, laptop, or other device and receive the approved document via email in the form of a PDF file!

Rajhu S Goraai
Rajhu S Goraai is a Passionate Blogger. Travel addict and Stock Trader. Co-founder and Editor of Leading Business & Tech Magazines.

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